Homily for the 2nd Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year B 2015

Homily for the Second Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year B 2015

The theme of today’s reading is obviously how God calls us and what our responses to that call are. This is apparent in all the readings today except for the reading from St. Paul which is usually never thematically connected to the other readings but is simply a weekly continuation of one of the Epistles. We see the theme of “the call of God” in the first reading when Samuel hears someone calling him in the night, and keeps running to his mentor Eli, thinking it must be him. This happens a few times, so Eli eventually suggests that the next time it happens, that Samuel just simple say “OK, I am here.” When Samuel is at rest and hears the call again, he simply says to God – I am here. What do you want? I am listening”, God speaks to him and lets Samuel know what he wants.

If we apply this to our own situations, I think that sometimes we are so busy that we either don’t hear God calling, or we do hear God  and mistake it for something else in our busy lives. If we simply can relax into prayer, and say to God, “OK. I am here. I am listening. Speak to me”, we might actually hear what God is telling us in our lives.

The Psalm picks up on this theme as well. “I waited patiently for the Lord.” If we can take the the time to listen and be patient, if we can say “Here I am, Lord: I come to do your will”, God will, as the psalm says, “incline” to you and put a new song of praise into your mouth.

So far we have learned that we have to do is calm down, be patient, listen intently, and tell God we are there to do what God wants, if we want to hear God. But the Gospel adds even more to this today.

First of all, this is the Gospel of John, not the Gospel of Mark, which we are normally using this year. And this same story in the Gospel of Mark, and for that matter in the other two Gospels, is different than John’s telling of it. In the Synoptic Gospels Jesus walks around calling people to follow him. The event of today as described by the Synoptics, has Jesus doing the seeking out. He goes to the shore where he observes Andrew and his brother Peter fishing, and he says, “Follow me”, and they do.

John’s account is a little different because it tells us that Andrew (the patron of our parish) is a follower of John the Baptist. Jesus walks by where John is preaching and baptizing. When John the Baptist announces that Jesus, this person who is walking by, is the lamb of God, Andrew and his companion, who is never named, take the initiative and follow Jesus. It is the reverse of the other Gospels. When Jesus realizes he is being followed, he turns around and asks the two men, “What are you looking for?” 

The two men do not answer Jesus’ question but instead ask another question in response: “Teacher, where are you staying?”

Now let us put ourselves into this situation and pretend we are the one with Andrew. We have just been listening to John the Baptist proclaiming a messiah, and that to get ready for a messiah, we had to repent, turn around and change ourselves. Then John points to someone walking by and calls that person a Lamb of God. What an odd thing, we think, to hear someone, a man, referred to as a lamb – and not just any lamb, but God’s lamb. If John thinks this person is important and yet puzzles us about his identity, we decide that we are going to follow this lamb and see what we can find out. We are curious.

So we do, but then,  this man turns around and asks us a question: “what are you looking for?” What are we looking for in our lives? Normally we might have turned that question around and asked God what he wants  or is looking for from us in our lives, but no. He asks us what we are looking for?

What would be our answer to such a question? . Would it be something minor? “I just wanted to see why John called you a lamb?” Would it be something selfish? “I just wanted to see how important you were so I could follow the best leader.” Would it be something selfless? “I just want to be of some help if you are the person John is telling us is coming.”

Now, today if we sat down to pray and we heard: “What are you looking for?”, would we have a good answer?

So, in this Gospel story we have placed ourselves in, we don’t have an answer, or are afraid to answer, so we simply throw a question back at Jesus. And our question is “Teacher, where are you staying?” This could be a simple response asking where Jesus was living, where his house was. But, of course, this is a Gospel, and it is never that simple. In Greek, the question implies, “Where can you be found, or where are you residing?” What we might be asking today is “Where can I find Jesus? Where can I find God?” Throughout the Gospels Jesus gives a variety of answers to that question, telling us that he stays with the Father or that he stays “in us”. Where do we find him today? In the tabernacle? in holy communion? in other people? in ourselves?

Jesus never really answers Andrew’s question, but simple says “Come and see.” Is this the “Follow me” that the other evangelists use? The reality is that we have to meet Jesus wherever he is, and that could be in a wide variety of people, situations, places and times.

So the result of these simple two questions and a Jesus statement was that Andrew and his companion went with Jesus, stayed with him (and the word stay here implies the patience in prayer we talked about earlier) and were so impressed, so sure that this was the Messiah whom John the Baptist had been preaching about, that they themselves became disciples and evangelizers.

The next thing Andrew did was to evangelize by going out and convincing his brother that he had found the Messiah and he brought Simon Peter to Jesus.

So, if we look closely at this pattern we can also apply this to our lives. We need to find Jesus, stay with him – through prayer, listen to him and by listening coming to know Jesus, and then we need to share that experience with others. That is what the CALL of Jesus is all about for the Gospel writer John.

This, I suggest to you is the pattern that is being given to us if we wish to become followers of Jesus and hear that call. Just something to think about this week, and very Good News if we have an answer to Jesus first question: “And what are you looking for?”

Bishop Ron Stephens

Pastor of St. Andrew’s Parish in Warrenton, VA

The Catholic Apostolic Church in North America (CACINA)

[You can purchase a complete Cycle A and Cycle B of Bishop Ron’s homilies, one for every Sunday and Feast, from amazon.com for $9.99 – “Teaching the Church Year”]

Advertisements

Tags: , ,

One Response to “Homily for the 2nd Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year B 2015”

  1. Alefina Lusiana Says:

    thank u lord for dua bible verse I Rilly like it

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: