Homily for the 4th Sunday in Ordinary Time Year B 2015

Homily for the Fourth Sunday in Ordinary Time Year B 2015

In the Book of Deuteronomy which is the last book of the 5 books that make up the Hebrew Pentateuch or Law, Moses speaks to the people just before they are to go into the Promised Land. Moses has not been permitted by God to go into the Promised Land and so he knows that he will shortly die. In his three long speeches to the Israelites he includes, near the end, a prophecy. Though we often think of Moses because of the Exodus story as a larger-than-life warring patriarch, he was actually a prophet of God. God spoke to him and he reported what God said to the people.

In our first reading today we hear the prophecy of Moses. Moses explains that the Israelites were afraid to hear the word of God directly lest they die, so that prophets were sent by God, like Moses, to let them know what God was saying to them. At this point Moses is saying that he is about die, but that God will raise up another prophet, similar to Moses, from the Israelite people. That Prophet needs to be listened to.

God says that he will put his own words into the mouth of the prophet and the prophet shall speak everything that he or she  is commanded to speak.

Now there were many prophets, as you know, because they all have books or prophecies in the Bible – Isaiah, Jeremiah, Jonah…and so on. But this is a special prophet because he will be like Moses…Moses, who led the people out of slavery and into a Promised Land.

Christians have seen in this prophecy the foretelling of Jesus who led us out of the slavery to sin and gave us the kingdom of heaven. The emphasis in Deuteronomy and in the Psalm today is on hearing this prophet and listening to his voice.

So when we get to the Gospel reading today what we see first is Jesus teaching, speaking to those gathered in the synagogue, and teaching them with authority. He is speaking God’s word for he is God in the flesh. The people in the synagogue are amazed at what this simple carpenter is saying to them, and word gets out that this man is a prophet.

But he is more than just a prophet for in the next section he performs an exorcism. The devil or the “unclean spirit” that is inside this man recognizes Jesus for who he is, and in fact calls him the Holy One of God. Jesus is not yet ready for the Hebrews to recognize the Messianic qualities about him so Jesus commands the unclean spirit to be quiet and exorcizes him, again with “authority”. That phrase comes up twice in the reading today – with authority – and because Mark’s Gospel is so short, to have something repeated makes it even more important. For someone to speak with authority, even today, means that the person is expert, knowledgable, forceful and in control. This “authority” is in direct contrast to what they know the man to be – a simple peasant from the poor outlying area, born of simple  working parents.

So at the beginning of Mark’s Gospel people are beginning to realize that this Jesus is no ordinary person, and they began to spread word around that Jesus was someone to be watched. His 15 minutes of fame had begun!

What has this to do with us today? I think first and foremost that we, too, have to recognize that Jesus is more than just a man. It is common today for people to think of him as a good man, but just a man, who had an intriguing take on what it meant to be a Jew in that day, and whose teachings have influenced many over the years. But Jesus is much more than that – and the mystery that Mark is trying to create here helps them and us to come to a realization of who this “man” really was, and what he was to do.

We take Jesus for granted in many ways today. Yes, we ask questions like “What would Jesus have done or said,” but many of us still think of him as simply a moral teacher. Somehow we have to have a recognition at some point in our lives that the man being talked about is more than a man. When that realization really hits us, we too can be “amazed” and “astounded” as were the men of Jesus’ time.

If we really believe that Jesus is God, that he is present here with us today, spiritually and physically, and that he has graced us with salvation and is ready to listen to our needs and prayers, we will celebrate with great respect, wonderful awe and great thanksgiving. That is why we come here each week – certainly not to be entertained or even enlightened – but to praise God, thank God and show our love and care for each other as a result of that love. That is what the word “Eucharist” means.

So as Mark gradually unfolds the mystery of the who Jesus Christ really was and is, let us try to unravel it with him in our hearts so that we can come to know Jesus in the fullest way possible and live out what he has freely given us in praise and thanksgiving. And that is the thrust of Mark’s Good News today!

Bishop Ron Stephens

Pastor of St. Andrew’s Parish in Warrenton, VA

The Catholic Apostolic Church in North America (CACINA)

[You can purchase a complete Cycle A and Cycle B of Bishop Ron’s homilies, one for every Sunday and Feast, from amazon.com for $9.99 – “Teaching the Church Year”]

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