Posts Tagged ‘prophecy’

Homily for the 29th Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year B 2015 (Oct 18)

October 11, 2015

Homily for the Twenty-Ninth Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year B 2015 (Oct 18)

The thing that joins the two integrated readings today, the Old Testament reading and the Gospel, is the very early theology of Jesus as a servant taking on the sins of us all and offering himself in sacrifice in our place. Isaiah talks about the righteous one, who is God’s servant, making many right with God by bearing their iniquities, carrying their wickedness. Isaiah says that this servant’s life is an offering for sin, not his own, but others’ sin. Not only that he will be in pain – he will be a suffering servant.

Very early on these prophecies of Isaiah were seen by the early church to be referenced to Jesus, and that the prophecies had come true. It helped them especially to make some sense of the senseless death of their friend and teacher. By looking backward to the prophecies of Isaiah they were able to piece together a theology of redemption – where one divine person was to suffer and die to compensate for the sins of the world.

I am sure that the initial death of Jesus had to throw the followers into more than panic that their leader had been killed. More, what was going to happen to them, what would happen to his teachings, what disappointment over the expectant messiah, what craziness to kill such a gentle, miracle man!

I am sure it took time and the influence of the Holy Spirit for the group to sort it out. The fact that they stayed together and still believed in what Jesus said was a real tribute to his followers. Often when a leader is killed, the others run off in all directions.

Writing the first Gospel, Mark has had the time, twenty years or more, to reflect on this situation, to go back to the Word of God in the Old Testament and notice the prophecies which seem to have been written with Jesus in mind. He then incorporates this throughout his Gospel so that that others can see that the story of God is a progression that moves toward and away from Jesus till he comes again.

We see this in the Isaiah reading today which seems to a Christian to be an apt description of exactly what Jesus life had accomplished. “The righteous one, my servant, shall make many righteous, and he shall bear their iniquities,” Isaiah foretold.

In today’s reading Mark shows Isaiah’s ‘servant’ comment with the little power struggle going on with the Apostles. We have seen again and again in Mark that the apostles were rather clueless and often just didn’t get the paradigm shift that Jesus was preaching. James and John ask, metaphorically perhaps, to sit at Jesus’ table in heaven. This is basically a power grab. The people who sit at the right and left of the host are the most honored guests, and of course, James and John knew that.

Then Jesus asks if they are up to letting what happens to Jesus happen to them. At this point, they don’t know he will be crucified, of course. They reply that they can take it, whatever.  Jesus explains that though he would do what he could for them, it was not his decision to pick the most honored guests – it was God’s. But they would share in his drink and his baptism. Little did they know that this meant his death and his suffering. Well, they got half their wish, anyway!

When the other Apostles heard what they had asked, they got pretty upset – they saw it for what it is was – a grab for power and favoritism in the group. They were pretty rough and tough men, and I am sure they made their feelings clear to James and John.

Time for an object lesson, saw Jesus! He called the group together and explained for the first time his theory of power and greatness. It must have made very little sense to the apostles when they first heard it because it was revolutionary – totally against the thinking of the time.

The powerful men that they knew – the Roman rulers and the Jewish leaders all lorded it over each other, doing what they wanted and thought best, and maintained a tight control over everyone.

But Jesus turns it around as he will once again at the Last Supper.

If you want to be great, Jesus said, you must lower yourself to be the servant of everyone – in fact, not just a servant, but a slave. The concerns of others must be your concern. Pleasing others must be your concern. Doing the wishes of others must be your concern.

Not the usual way of looking at power and greatness, even today, though it seems to me democracy should come close to it if the leader really does listen to his electorate and try to act on their needs and wishes. That’s the theory, isn’t it?

What does this mean for us this week? How can we be better servants to others, particularly those we have some control over. Many parents are able to balance this need to be a parent with knowing and understanding the needs of the children as well. But, if you are in charge of anyone – in an office, or as head of a committee, or as a Board member – how can you increase serving the needs of others and thinking of your own needs less. When I came in as the new principal of a large high school, I knew that the person I replaced had been a bit of a dictatorial leader. At my first staff meeting, instead of talking at everyone, I asked them to break into groups and discuss what were their greatest priorities for the school year. No one even moved. Finally, one of them got up and said, “We don’t do things like discuss here! Just tell us what to do, and we’ll do it.” It took me bout three years to get them to see that I really was interested in what they had to say and would move in the directions that the group needed and wanted. I think they actually ended up liking it – though I lost a few in that paradigm change.

I also want you to consider being a servant to other church members here. At base, what this means is that you don’t come to church for yourself – you are here because it is important to the others here. Without you, there is a gap…something is missing. Just coming as regularly as you can is being a servant to the others in the congregation.

Look around this week and see if there are ways to put Christ’s servant-leadership into practice in your life. You might be amazed at what happens, and how freeing it actually becomes for you as well.

This is some Good News that we can all work at and I wish you well in trying it.

Bishop Ron Stephens

Pastor of St. Andrew’s Parish in Warrenton, VA

The Catholic Apostolic Church in North America (CACINA)

[Prepare for next year! Volume 3 (Luke) of Bishop Ron’s homilies, one for every Sunday and Feast, is available from amazon.com for $9.99 – “Teaching the Church Year”]

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Homily for the 15th Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year B 2015 (July 12 )

July 5, 2015

Homily for the Fifteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year B 2015 

We continue today with readings that deal with Prophets or Apostles.If you remember from last week, prophets were inspired by the Spirit to speak God’s words. We also learned that it didn’t matter who you were or how much knowledge a person had, if God wanted you to prophesy, you did.

We see that again in todays reading, not from Ezekiel as last week, but from the prophet Amos who was surprised to get a calling from God, told to him by the priest Amaziah. He says that he isn’t a prophet or isn’t the son of a prophet. Why would the king think that he could go and earn his living prophesying. He was just a simple herdsmen and horticulturalist. What was he even thinking?

Again God works in ways that confound us. Amos must have had something that God saw because he indeed call him to be a prophet, and to make his living at it.

We need to be open to God. The Psalm today expresses it well when it says “Let me hear what the Lord will speak, for he will speak peace to his people.” We have to learn to listen to God – God could be calling any one of us, even if we think we are not worthy, not knowledgeable enough, not brave enough. God’s Spirit will come to us and work through us. We simply have to let it happen and be open to it.

As we move into the New Testament in our readings we hear Paul preaching some really good news to us of redemption and forgiveness of sin, and Paul seems to think that we have all become Prophets because the Spirit is in us, and the grace of God has been given to us. “With all wisdom and insight,” he says, “God has made known to us the mystery of his will, according to his good pleasure that he set forth in Christ.” In order for this to happen, he says, we have been “marked with he seal of the promised Holy Spirit.”  We saw last week that that was the first thing that happens to a Prophet – God’s Spirit enters one. So in that sense we are all prophets, and that is why in the Gospel today we see Jesus sending out his disciples to continue his work of healing and preaching of repentance.

It is interested that the new prophets are sent out not alone, but two by two. Unlike Amos, who was paid for his prophesying, the Apostles are to ask nothing in return, and they are to go out with nothing. They will be taken care of in welcoming homes – they will not starve. It is true that in this period there was a great deal of generosity toward visitors – there were no motels – so the traveller was at the mercy of the good will of others. And visitors were treated with care, often more than family.

But Jesus also says that if they don’t listen to your words of repentance, simply leave the house and shake the dust off their feet and move on.

The idea of sending the Apostles two by two intrigues me. We have echoes of Noah’s ark, and even of the Genesis statement – it is not good for a man to be alone.” Certainly the company on the long journey would be good, might also help keep them safer on the road. Probably though, the idea was that two people could witness the truth for each other, showing that they agree on the doctrine of repentance. Two saying and believing the same thing makes a better case perhaps. They were more reliable witnesses to what Jesus had said and done.Many Protestant groups take this literally and send out their members two by two even today.

Finally, Jesus gave the gift of exorcism to the Apostles.  What this indicates is that first and foremost they were fighting Satan, and so they were able to cast out many demons. It isn’t popular for us today except in horror movies to believe in exorcism, but the church right from the beginning of Christianity has always seen it as a fight against Satan in the same way that Christ was tempted by the devil, though he was able to win the fight by himself. We also see here an early example of the Sacrament of the Sick when the Apostles anointed someone with oil and cured them of disease. When most of us were younger this sacrament had morphed into a sacrament for those who were dying, and was even called Extreme Unction – given only in extreme cases. This was never its true use, however, and Vatican II brought back the idea that anointing is for any sick person. So if I come and anoint you, don’t have a heart attack because you think you are about to die!

What I would like you to leave with today, however, is the idea that you are a prophet, and you need to listen to what God is calling you to do or say. We don’t listen enough – we are always thinking of replies to a person today. Just listen. You might be surprised what you hear, and you might even be as terrified as some of the prophets to find out just what God is calling you to. Remember, though, as Paul said last week: ”his grace is enough!” and if God calls you, he will help through whatever it is God asks you to do.

And that is the Good News of our prophetic vocation today. God bless.

Bishop Ron Stephens

Pastor of St. Andrew’s Parish in Warrenton, VA

The Catholic Apostolic Church in North America (CACINA)

[You can purchase a complete Cycle A and Cycle B of Bishop Ron’s homilies, one for every Sunday and Feast, from amazon.com for $9.99 – “Teaching the Church Year”]

Homily for the 4th Sunday in Ordinary Time Year B 2015

January 25, 2015

Homily for the Fourth Sunday in Ordinary Time Year B 2015

In the Book of Deuteronomy which is the last book of the 5 books that make up the Hebrew Pentateuch or Law, Moses speaks to the people just before they are to go into the Promised Land. Moses has not been permitted by God to go into the Promised Land and so he knows that he will shortly die. In his three long speeches to the Israelites he includes, near the end, a prophecy. Though we often think of Moses because of the Exodus story as a larger-than-life warring patriarch, he was actually a prophet of God. God spoke to him and he reported what God said to the people.

In our first reading today we hear the prophecy of Moses. Moses explains that the Israelites were afraid to hear the word of God directly lest they die, so that prophets were sent by God, like Moses, to let them know what God was saying to them. At this point Moses is saying that he is about die, but that God will raise up another prophet, similar to Moses, from the Israelite people. That Prophet needs to be listened to.

God says that he will put his own words into the mouth of the prophet and the prophet shall speak everything that he or she  is commanded to speak.

Now there were many prophets, as you know, because they all have books or prophecies in the Bible – Isaiah, Jeremiah, Jonah…and so on. But this is a special prophet because he will be like Moses…Moses, who led the people out of slavery and into a Promised Land.

Christians have seen in this prophecy the foretelling of Jesus who led us out of the slavery to sin and gave us the kingdom of heaven. The emphasis in Deuteronomy and in the Psalm today is on hearing this prophet and listening to his voice.

So when we get to the Gospel reading today what we see first is Jesus teaching, speaking to those gathered in the synagogue, and teaching them with authority. He is speaking God’s word for he is God in the flesh. The people in the synagogue are amazed at what this simple carpenter is saying to them, and word gets out that this man is a prophet.

But he is more than just a prophet for in the next section he performs an exorcism. The devil or the “unclean spirit” that is inside this man recognizes Jesus for who he is, and in fact calls him the Holy One of God. Jesus is not yet ready for the Hebrews to recognize the Messianic qualities about him so Jesus commands the unclean spirit to be quiet and exorcizes him, again with “authority”. That phrase comes up twice in the reading today – with authority – and because Mark’s Gospel is so short, to have something repeated makes it even more important. For someone to speak with authority, even today, means that the person is expert, knowledgable, forceful and in control. This “authority” is in direct contrast to what they know the man to be – a simple peasant from the poor outlying area, born of simple  working parents.

So at the beginning of Mark’s Gospel people are beginning to realize that this Jesus is no ordinary person, and they began to spread word around that Jesus was someone to be watched. His 15 minutes of fame had begun!

What has this to do with us today? I think first and foremost that we, too, have to recognize that Jesus is more than just a man. It is common today for people to think of him as a good man, but just a man, who had an intriguing take on what it meant to be a Jew in that day, and whose teachings have influenced many over the years. But Jesus is much more than that – and the mystery that Mark is trying to create here helps them and us to come to a realization of who this “man” really was, and what he was to do.

We take Jesus for granted in many ways today. Yes, we ask questions like “What would Jesus have done or said,” but many of us still think of him as simply a moral teacher. Somehow we have to have a recognition at some point in our lives that the man being talked about is more than a man. When that realization really hits us, we too can be “amazed” and “astounded” as were the men of Jesus’ time.

If we really believe that Jesus is God, that he is present here with us today, spiritually and physically, and that he has graced us with salvation and is ready to listen to our needs and prayers, we will celebrate with great respect, wonderful awe and great thanksgiving. That is why we come here each week – certainly not to be entertained or even enlightened – but to praise God, thank God and show our love and care for each other as a result of that love. That is what the word “Eucharist” means.

So as Mark gradually unfolds the mystery of the who Jesus Christ really was and is, let us try to unravel it with him in our hearts so that we can come to know Jesus in the fullest way possible and live out what he has freely given us in praise and thanksgiving. And that is the thrust of Mark’s Good News today!

Bishop Ron Stephens

Pastor of St. Andrew’s Parish in Warrenton, VA

The Catholic Apostolic Church in North America (CACINA)

[You can purchase a complete Cycle A and Cycle B of Bishop Ron’s homilies, one for every Sunday and Feast, from amazon.com for $9.99 – “Teaching the Church Year”]